Art Guide: AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft

Art Guide

AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft

A virtual tour of AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft led by Chief Curator Tobias Ostrander, as well as interviews by artists Adrian Esparza and Polly Apfelbaum and highlights of works in the gallery.

 
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AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft

AMERICANA is exhibited in six large galleries conceived for permanent collection displays. These “overview galleries” run through the first and second floors forming a spine that joins the remaining ten changing exhibition and project spaces.  AMERICANA is an English and Spanish word that broadly describes images and objects produced in the Americas and typical of American cultures. Here it is intended to evoke a unique hemispheric perspective that reaches across national borders.

AMERICANA includes art produced in South America, North America, and the Caribbean presented in the form of six short visual essays, each offering a critical perspective on a set of issues in modern culture and society:  Formalizing Craft, Corporal Violence, and Commodity Cultures, Desiring Landscape, Sources of the Self, and Progressive Forms

AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft
Craft traditions differ radically across cultures and generations and involve a vast array of materials, many examples of which are on view in this gallery including fired clay, dyed fabric, quilted materials, mosaicked objects, and woven textiles. Beginning in the 1960s, many feminist artists turned to craft as a celebration of aesthetic forms historically developed by women in both North and South America and as a critique of male-dominated abstract painting tendencies prevalent during this period. From the same period, craft has also been used to reference art-making traditions outside of the West. AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft includes examples of work by pioneering artists alongside work by artists of more recent generations who allude to these precedents in order to address contemporary issues of gender and other identity constructs, as well as diverse cultural narratives.

AMERICANA is exhibited in six large galleries conceived for permanent collection displays. These “overview galleries” run through the first and second floors forming a spine that joins the remaining ten changing exhibition and project spaces.  AMERICANA is an English and Spanish word that broadly describes images and objects produced in the Americas and typical of American cultures. Here it is intended to evoke a unique hemispheric perspective that reaches across national borders.

AMERICANA includes art produced in South America, North America, and the Caribbean presented in the form of six short visual essays, each offering a critical perspective on a set of issues in modern culture and society:  Formalizing Craft, Corporal Violence, and Commodity Cultures, Desiring Landscape, Sources of the Self, and Progressive Forms

AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft
Craft traditions differ radically across cultures and generations and involve a vast array of materials, many examples of which are on view in this gallery including fired clay, dyed fabric, quilted materials, mosaicked objects, and woven textiles. Beginning in the 1960s, many feminist artists turned to craft as a celebration of aesthetic forms historically developed by women in both North and South America and as a critique of male-dominated abstract painting tendencies prevalent during this period. From the same period, craft has also been used to reference art-making traditions outside of the West. AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft includes examples of work by pioneering artists alongside work by artists of more recent generations who allude to these precedents in order to address contemporary issues of gender and other identity constructs, as well as diverse cultural narratives.

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Floor 2 - Collection: Neerja Sethi and Bharat Desai Gallery

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AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft with PAMM Chief Curator Tobias Ostrander

AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft
Craft traditions differ radically across cultures and generations and involve a vast array of materials, many examples of which are on view in this gallery including fired clay, dyed fabric, quilted materials, mosaicked objects, and woven textiles. Beginning in the 1960s, many feminist artists turned to craft as a celebration of aesthetic forms historically developed by women in both North and South America and as a critique of male-dominated abstract painting tendencies prevalent during this period. From the same period, craft has also been used to reference art-making traditions outside of the West. AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft includes examples of work by pioneering artists alongside work by artists of more recent generations who allude to these precedents in order to address contemporary issues of gender and other identity constructs, as well as diverse cultural narratives.

AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft
Craft traditions differ radically across cultures and generations and involve a vast array of materials, many examples of which are on view in this gallery including fired clay, dyed fabric, quilted materials, mosaicked objects, and woven textiles. Beginning in the 1960s, many feminist artists turned to craft as a celebration of aesthetic forms historically developed by women in both North and South America and as a critique of male-dominated abstract painting tendencies prevalent during this period. From the same period, craft has also been used to reference art-making traditions outside of the West. AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft includes examples of work by pioneering artists alongside work by artists of more recent generations who allude to these precedents in order to address contemporary issues of gender and other identity constructs, as well as diverse cultural narratives.

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Floor 2 - Collection: Neerja Sethi and Bharat Desai Gallery

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AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft - Adrian Esparza

AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft
Visit pamm.org/exhibitions for more information

Adrian Esparza 
"Wake and Wonder," 2013
Nails, thread, and serape
12 x 30 feet
Installation view Pérez Art Museum Miami
Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, museum purchase with funds provided by Darlene and Jorge M. Pérez and the Helena Rubinstein Philanthropic Fund at The Miami Foundation

AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft
Visit pamm.org/exhibitions for more information

Adrian Esparza 
"Wake and Wonder," 2013
Nails, thread, and serape
12 x 30 feet
Installation view Pérez Art Museum Miami
Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, museum purchase with funds provided by Darlene and Jorge M. Pérez and the Helena Rubinstein Philanthropic Fund at The Miami Foundation

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Floor 2 - Collection: Neerja Sethi and Bharat Desai Gallery

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AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft - Polly Apfelbaum

AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft
Visit pamm.org/exhibitions for more information

Polly Apfelbaum
Mojo Jojo (detail), 2001
Velvet and dye
18 feet in diameter
Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, museum purchase with fund provided by the PAMM Collectors Council and the Helena Rubinstein Foundation

AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft
Visit pamm.org/exhibitions for more information

Polly Apfelbaum
Mojo Jojo (detail), 2001
Velvet and dye
18 feet in diameter
Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, museum purchase with fund provided by the PAMM Collectors Council and the Helena Rubinstein Foundation

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Floor 2 - Collection: Neerja Sethi and Bharat Desai Gallery

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Al Loving, Untitled #32, c. 1975. Mixed media. 121-3/4 x 112 inches

AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft
Visit pamm.org/exhibitions for more information

Al Loving
Untitled #32, c. 1975
Mixed media
121-3/4 x 112 inches

Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, museum purchase with funds provided by Jorge M. Pérez and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation 

AMERICANA: Formalizing Craft
Visit pamm.org/exhibitions for more information

Al Loving
Untitled #32, c. 1975
Mixed media
121-3/4 x 112 inches

Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, museum purchase with funds provided by Jorge M. Pérez and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation 

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Floor 2 - Collection: Neerja Sethi and Bharat Desai Gallery

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