Art Guide: AMERICANA: Corporal Violence

Art Guide

AMERICANA: Corporal Violence

A virtual tour of AMERICANA: Corporal Violence led by Chief Curator Tobias Ostrander, who introduces the themes and highlights works in the gallery. 

 
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AMERICANA: Corporal Violence

AMERICANA is exhibited in six large galleries conceived for permanent collection displays. These “overview galleries” run through the first and second floors forming a spine that joins the remaining ten changing exhibition and project spaces.  AMERICANA is an English and Spanish word that broadly describes images and objects produced in the Americas and typical of American cultures. Here it is intended to evoke a unique hemispheric perspective that reaches across national borders.

AMERICANA includes art produced in South America, North America, and the Caribbean presented in the form of six short visual essays, each offering a critical perspective on a set of issues in modern culture and society:  Formalizing Craft, Corporal Violence, and Commodity Cultures, Desiring Landscape, Sources of the Self, and Progressive Forms

AMERICANA: Corporal Violence
In contrast to the abstract forms of Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction of the 1960s and 1970s, representational drawing, painting, and conceptual practices from the same period were often employed in an effort to protest institutionalized, government sponsored violence in both Latin America and the United States. The works presented in this gallery feature the wounded, fragmented, or “disappeared” body and address diverse political contexts and events from the past fifty years. In the U.S., these include the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the more recent interrogations at the detention camp at Guantanamo Bay; and in Latin America, the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile and the history of guerilla and drug-related violence in Colombia.

AMERICANA is exhibited in six large galleries conceived for permanent collection displays. These “overview galleries” run through the first and second floors forming a spine that joins the remaining ten changing exhibition and project spaces.  AMERICANA is an English and Spanish word that broadly describes images and objects produced in the Americas and typical of American cultures. Here it is intended to evoke a unique hemispheric perspective that reaches across national borders.

AMERICANA includes art produced in South America, North America, and the Caribbean presented in the form of six short visual essays, each offering a critical perspective on a set of issues in modern culture and society:  Formalizing Craft, Corporal Violence, and Commodity Cultures, Desiring Landscape, Sources of the Self, and Progressive Forms

AMERICANA: Corporal Violence
In contrast to the abstract forms of Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction of the 1960s and 1970s, representational drawing, painting, and conceptual practices from the same period were often employed in an effort to protest institutionalized, government sponsored violence in both Latin America and the United States. The works presented in this gallery feature the wounded, fragmented, or “disappeared” body and address diverse political contexts and events from the past fifty years. In the U.S., these include the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the more recent interrogations at the detention camp at Guantanamo Bay; and in Latin America, the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile and the history of guerilla and drug-related violence in Colombia.

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Floor 2 - Collection: Nedra and Ron Kalish Gallery

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AMERICANA: Corporal Violence

AMERICANA is exhibited in six large galleries conceived for permanent collection displays. These “overview galleries” run through the first and second floors forming a spine that joins the remaining ten changing exhibition and project spaces.  AMERICANA is an English and Spanish word that broadly describes images and objects produced in the Americas and typical of American cultures. Here it is intended to evoke a unique hemispheric perspective that reaches across national borders.

AMERICANA includes art produced in South America, North America, and the Caribbean presented in the form of six short visual essays, each offering a critical perspective on a set of issues in modern culture and society:  Formalizing Craft, Corporal Violence, and Commodity Cultures, Desiring Landscape, Sources of the Self, and Progressive Forms

AMERICANA: Corporal Violence
In contrast to the abstract forms of Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction of the 1960s and 1970s, representational drawing, painting, and conceptual practices from the same period were often employed in an effort to protest institutionalized, government sponsored violence in both Latin America and the United States. The works presented in this gallery feature the wounded, fragmented, or “disappeared” body and address diverse political contexts and events from the past fifty years. In the U.S., these include the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the more recent interrogations at the detention camp at Guantanamo Bay; and in Latin America, the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile and the history of guerilla and drug-related violence in Colombia.

AMERICANA is exhibited in six large galleries conceived for permanent collection displays. These “overview galleries” run through the first and second floors forming a spine that joins the remaining ten changing exhibition and project spaces.  AMERICANA is an English and Spanish word that broadly describes images and objects produced in the Americas and typical of American cultures. Here it is intended to evoke a unique hemispheric perspective that reaches across national borders.

AMERICANA includes art produced in South America, North America, and the Caribbean presented in the form of six short visual essays, each offering a critical perspective on a set of issues in modern culture and society:  Formalizing Craft, Corporal Violence, and Commodity Cultures, Desiring Landscape, Sources of the Self, and Progressive Forms

AMERICANA: Corporal Violence
In contrast to the abstract forms of Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction of the 1960s and 1970s, representational drawing, painting, and conceptual practices from the same period were often employed in an effort to protest institutionalized, government sponsored violence in both Latin America and the United States. The works presented in this gallery feature the wounded, fragmented, or “disappeared” body and address diverse political contexts and events from the past fifty years. In the U.S., these include the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the more recent interrogations at the detention camp at Guantanamo Bay; and in Latin America, the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile and the history of guerilla and drug-related violence in Colombia.

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Floor 2 - Collection: Nedra and Ron Kalish Gallery

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Faith Ringgold, "American People Series #18: The Flag is Bleeding," 1967. Oil on canvas. 72 x 96 inches. Courtesy of Faith Ringgold and ACA Galleries,New York. ©Faith Ringgold 1967. Photo courtesy ACA Galleries, New York

AMERICANA: Corporal Violence In contrast to the abstract forms of Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction of the 1960s and 1970s, representational drawing, painting, and conceptual practices from the same period were often employed in an effort to protest institutionalized, government sponsored violence in both Latin America and the United States. The works presented in this gallery feature the wounded, fragmented, or “disappeared” body and address diverse political contexts and events from the past fifty years. In the U.S., these include the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the more recent interrogations at the detention camp at Guantanamo Bay; and in Latin America, the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile and the history of guerilla and drug-related violence in Colombia.

AMERICANA: Corporal Violence In contrast to the abstract forms of Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction of the 1960s and 1970s, representational drawing, painting, and conceptual practices from the same period were often employed in an effort to protest institutionalized, government sponsored violence in both Latin America and the United States. The works presented in this gallery feature the wounded, fragmented, or “disappeared” body and address diverse political contexts and events from the past fifty years. In the U.S., these include the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the more recent interrogations at the detention camp at Guantanamo Bay; and in Latin America, the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile and the history of guerilla and drug-related violence in Colombia.

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Floor 2 - Collection: Nedra and Ron Kalish Gallery

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Oscar Muñoz, Cortinas de baño, 1994 Acrylic on plastic 74 x 28 1/2 inches, each curtain; 5 curtains Installation view Pérez Art Museum Miami Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, gift of George M. Safirstein M. D. and Pola Reydburd

AMERICANA: Corporal Violence
In contrast to the abstract forms of Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction of the 1960s and 1970s, representational drawing, painting, and conceptual practices from the same period were often employed in an effort to protest institutionalized, government sponsored violence in both Latin America and the United States. The works presented in this gallery feature the wounded, fragmented, or “disappeared” body and address diverse political contexts and events from the past fifty years. In the U.S., these include the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the more recent interrogations at the detention camp at Guantanamo Bay; and in Latin America, the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile and the history of guerilla and drug-related violence in Colombia.

AMERICANA: Corporal Violence
In contrast to the abstract forms of Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction of the 1960s and 1970s, representational drawing, painting, and conceptual practices from the same period were often employed in an effort to protest institutionalized, government sponsored violence in both Latin America and the United States. The works presented in this gallery feature the wounded, fragmented, or “disappeared” body and address diverse political contexts and events from the past fifty years. In the U.S., these include the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the more recent interrogations at the detention camp at Guantanamo Bay; and in Latin America, the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile and the history of guerilla and drug-related violence in Colombia.

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Floor 2 - Collection: Nedra and Ron Kalish Gallery

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AMERICANA: Corporal Violence

AMERICANA: Corporal Violence
Installation view Pérez Art Museum Miami
Photo credit: Daniel Azoulay photography

In contrast to the abstract forms of Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction of the 1960s and 1970s, representational drawing, painting, and conceptual practices from the same period were often employed in an effort to protest institutionalized, government sponsored violence in both Latin America and the United States. The works presented in this gallery feature the wounded, fragmented, or “disappeared” body and address diverse political contexts and events from the past fifty years. In the U.S., these include the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the more recent interrogations at the detention camp at Guantanamo Bay; and in Latin America, the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile and the history of guerilla and drug-related violence in Colombia.

AMERICANA: Corporal Violence
Installation view Pérez Art Museum Miami
Photo credit: Daniel Azoulay photography

In contrast to the abstract forms of Minimalism and Geometric Abstraction of the 1960s and 1970s, representational drawing, painting, and conceptual practices from the same period were often employed in an effort to protest institutionalized, government sponsored violence in both Latin America and the United States. The works presented in this gallery feature the wounded, fragmented, or “disappeared” body and address diverse political contexts and events from the past fifty years. In the U.S., these include the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and the more recent interrogations at the detention camp at Guantanamo Bay; and in Latin America, the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile and the history of guerilla and drug-related violence in Colombia.

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11.

Floor 2 - Collection: Nedra and Ron Kalish Gallery

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