Art Guide: AMERICANA: Sources of the Self

Art Guide

AMERICANA: Sources of the Self

A virtual tour of AMERICANA: Sources of the Self  led by Chief Curator Tobias Ostrander, who introduces the themes and highlights works in the gallery.

 
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AMERICANA: Sources of the Self

AMERICANA: Sources of the Self
​This gallery contains artworks from the collection that address traditions involving the unconscious, myth, and ritual as tools for self-definition and identity formation. Several works reference “automatic writing,” gestural drawing techniques pursued by the Surrealists during the early part of the twentieth century. Inspired by the research of Sigmund Freud (1865-1935) and his theories of the unconscious mind, these drawing practices sought to simulate a state close to that of dreams or trance, in order to access otherwise hidden or repressed aspects of the self through the production of forms uninfluenced by reason and the aesthetics of Western culture. Other works reference ancient European, African and South American power symbols related to life, death, sexuality, and reproduction. These symbols are used to push abstraction in diverse and enigmatic directions. In several works they also form part of feminist critiques of traditionally male-dominated histories and modes of expression.

AMERICANA: Sources of the Self
​This gallery contains artworks from the collection that address traditions involving the unconscious, myth, and ritual as tools for self-definition and identity formation. Several works reference “automatic writing,” gestural drawing techniques pursued by the Surrealists during the early part of the twentieth century. Inspired by the research of Sigmund Freud (1865-1935) and his theories of the unconscious mind, these drawing practices sought to simulate a state close to that of dreams or trance, in order to access otherwise hidden or repressed aspects of the self through the production of forms uninfluenced by reason and the aesthetics of Western culture. Other works reference ancient European, African and South American power symbols related to life, death, sexuality, and reproduction. These symbols are used to push abstraction in diverse and enigmatic directions. In several works they also form part of feminist critiques of traditionally male-dominated histories and modes of expression.

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Floor 1 - Collection: Lori and Milton Ferrell Gallery

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AMERICANA: Sources of the Self with Chief Curator, Tobias Ostrander

AMERICANA: Sources of the Self 
​This gallery contains artworks from the collection that address traditions involving the unconscious, myth, and ritual as tools for self-definition and identity formation. Several works reference “automatic writing,” gestural drawing techniques pursued by the Surrealists during the early part of the twentieth century. Inspired by the research of Sigmund Freud (1865-1935) and his theories of the unconscious mind, these drawing practices sought to simulate a state close to that of dreams or trance, in order to access otherwise hidden or repressed aspects of the self through the production of forms uninfluenced by reason and the aesthetics of Western culture. Other works reference ancient European, African and South American power symbols related to life, death, sexuality, and reproduction. These symbols are used to push abstraction in diverse and enigmatic directions. In several works they also form part of feminist critiques of traditionally male-dominated histories and modes of expression.

AMERICANA: Sources of the Self 
​This gallery contains artworks from the collection that address traditions involving the unconscious, myth, and ritual as tools for self-definition and identity formation. Several works reference “automatic writing,” gestural drawing techniques pursued by the Surrealists during the early part of the twentieth century. Inspired by the research of Sigmund Freud (1865-1935) and his theories of the unconscious mind, these drawing practices sought to simulate a state close to that of dreams or trance, in order to access otherwise hidden or repressed aspects of the self through the production of forms uninfluenced by reason and the aesthetics of Western culture. Other works reference ancient European, African and South American power symbols related to life, death, sexuality, and reproduction. These symbols are used to push abstraction in diverse and enigmatic directions. In several works they also form part of feminist critiques of traditionally male-dominated histories and modes of expression.

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Floor 1 - Collection: Lori and Milton Ferrell Gallery

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José Bedia, Mamá quiere menga, menga de su nkombo, 1988. Collection Pérez Art Museum Miami, gift of Robert and Dede Moss.

AMERICANA: Sources of the Self 
​This gallery contains artworks from the collection that address traditions involving the unconscious, myth, and ritual as tools for self-definition and identity formation. Several works reference “automatic writing,” gestural drawing techniques pursued by the Surrealists during the early part of the twentieth century. Inspired by the research of Sigmund Freud (1865-1935) and his theories of the unconscious mind, these drawing practices sought to simulate a state close to that of dreams or trance, in order to access otherwise hidden or repressed aspects of the self through the production of forms uninfluenced by reason and the aesthetics of Western culture. Other works reference ancient European, African and South American power symbols related to life, death, sexuality, and reproduction. These symbols are used to push abstraction in diverse and enigmatic directions. In several works they also form part of feminist critiques of traditionally male-dominated histories and modes of expression.

AMERICANA: Sources of the Self 
​This gallery contains artworks from the collection that address traditions involving the unconscious, myth, and ritual as tools for self-definition and identity formation. Several works reference “automatic writing,” gestural drawing techniques pursued by the Surrealists during the early part of the twentieth century. Inspired by the research of Sigmund Freud (1865-1935) and his theories of the unconscious mind, these drawing practices sought to simulate a state close to that of dreams or trance, in order to access otherwise hidden or repressed aspects of the self through the production of forms uninfluenced by reason and the aesthetics of Western culture. Other works reference ancient European, African and South American power symbols related to life, death, sexuality, and reproduction. These symbols are used to push abstraction in diverse and enigmatic directions. In several works they also form part of feminist critiques of traditionally male-dominated histories and modes of expression.

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Floor 1 - Collection: Lori and Milton Ferrell Gallery

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Roberto Matta, Crucifixion (Crucifixión), 1938. © 2013 SIAE, Rome / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Photo credit: Sid Hoeltzell

AMERICANA: Sources of the Self ​
​This gallery contains artworks from the collection that address traditions involving the unconscious, myth, and ritual as tools for self-definition and identity formation. Several works reference “automatic writing,” gestural drawing techniques pursued by the Surrealists during the early part of the twentieth century. Inspired by the research of Sigmund Freud (1865-1935) and his theories of the unconscious mind, these drawing practices sought to simulate a state close to that of dreams or trance, in order to access otherwise hidden or repressed aspects of the self through the production of forms uninfluenced by reason and the aesthetics of Western culture. Other works reference ancient European, African and South American power symbols related to life, death, sexuality, and reproduction. These symbols are used to push abstraction in diverse and enigmatic directions. In several works they also form part of feminist critiques of traditionally male-dominated histories and modes of expression.

AMERICANA: Sources of the Self ​
​This gallery contains artworks from the collection that address traditions involving the unconscious, myth, and ritual as tools for self-definition and identity formation. Several works reference “automatic writing,” gestural drawing techniques pursued by the Surrealists during the early part of the twentieth century. Inspired by the research of Sigmund Freud (1865-1935) and his theories of the unconscious mind, these drawing practices sought to simulate a state close to that of dreams or trance, in order to access otherwise hidden or repressed aspects of the self through the production of forms uninfluenced by reason and the aesthetics of Western culture. Other works reference ancient European, African and South American power symbols related to life, death, sexuality, and reproduction. These symbols are used to push abstraction in diverse and enigmatic directions. In several works they also form part of feminist critiques of traditionally male-dominated histories and modes of expression.

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8.

Floor 1 - Collection: Lori and Milton Ferrell Gallery

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